Cabo San Lucas Arch

Painted in 2013. The infamous Arch at Love Beach in Cabo San Lucas, MX. A hurricane in the nineties wiped away this access to the back of the arch from Love Beach and is only accessible by boat now. There was a well-explored cave to the left of it as well. Haven’t been back in many years…the land of tequila and timeshares…..

My paintings are now on display right outside of Sedona, AZ at “The Miner’s Pick Gallery” in Jerome at 123 Hill Street located at what once was the hospital and surgeon’s home. Stop in and see Melissa and their incredible offerings of natural wood furniture, crystals, gemstones, geodes, and fossils along with my artwork hanging on the walls. For more paintings go to http://www.ipadimagination.com

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Bryce Canyon

I painted this one in 2014 shortly after a trip to Zion and Bryce National Parks. The Hoo Doo’s were difficult to capture the feel in this digital painting. If you’ve ever seen them you know how incredible they are, merely fragile sand piles supporting a large rock at their peaks. I love the Southwest and it’s colors so this is one of my favorites.

Black SandBLUE HAWAII

Here’s a way to warm up if you’re on the East Coast or Midwest. These were painted in 2012 and were some of the first attempts at digital art with my iPad. Hope they bring some warmth to your day!

My paintings are now on display right outside of Sedona, AZ at “The Miner’s Pick Gallery” in Jerome at 123 Hill Street located at what once was the hospital and surgeon’s home. Stop in and see Melissa and their incredible offerings of natural wood furniture, crystals, gemstones, geodes, and fossils along with my artwork hanging on the walls. For more paintings go to http://www.ipadimagination.com

Pheiffer Falls This is my favorite Big Sur painting….it’s source is a photograph I took in 1994 while trespassing on private land and getting out quickly. It is also known as Pheiffer Falls but Pheiffer Beach is located further north…this is the Julia Pheiffer State Park area. At one time there was a boardwalk that went down the side of the hill to the beach that has been destroyed from the fierce stormy winter weather. My paintings are now on display right outside of Sedona, AZ at “The Miner’s Pick Gallery” in Jerome at 123 Hill Street located at what once was the hospital and surgeon’s home. Stop in and see Melissa and their incredible offerings of natural wood furniture, crystals, gemstones, geodes, and fossils along with my artwork hanging on the walls. For more paintings go to http://www.ipadimagination.com

BIG SUR FOG FINGERSBigSurCoast

The enchantment of Big Sur began at age 16 when a group of crazy teenagers flew across the country in a 1970 Buick LeSabre at speeds of over 140 mph from New Jersey to California. I documented that “coming of age” trip in a book “Only Moments” many years later. Big Sur was the epicenter of incredible beauty, danger, and a magnet for all types of people in my generation. From the writer Henry Miller, to the beats, to the children of the sixties this place was magical….and still is. The paintings were done in 2013 and there is one more that I will post next that is my favorite and was the hardest to do….

My paintings are now on display right outside of Sedona, AZ at “The Miner’s Pick Gallery” in Jerome at 123 Hill Street located at what once was the hospital and surgeon’s home. Stop in and see Melissa and their incredible offerings of natural wood furniture, crystals, gemstones, geodes, and fossils along with my artwork hanging on the walls.

For more paintings go to http://www.ipadimagination.com

AnotherWorld

This painting was so much fun especially the small moons and the rings. It was my first venture into “space” so to speak and the minature aspects were the most challenging.

My paintings are now on display right outside of Sedona, AZ at “The Miner’s Pick Gallery” in Jerome at 123 Hill Street located at what once was the hospital and surgeon’s home. Stop in and see Melissa and their incredible offerings of natural wood furniture, crystals, gemstones, geodes, and fossils along with my artwork hanging on the walls.

For more paintings go to http://www.ipadimagination.com

Aloha Painted in 2013

I love painting sunsets and ocean. The long distance field of view is challenging and pushes me to learn different techniques each time. I am an untrained artist and have always enjoyed doing things for the first time…it is my strength and my nemesis at times….but that’s the Yin and Yang of life….to keep dancing between them is the only goal there is….nothing further….now to keep breathing and let it happen….stream of conciousness painting….

AllThisLife'sJustADream2

Much has happened since I last posted on WordPress years ago. Too much to get into details.  I’m posting my artwork that I’ve compiled since 2012.  No stylus or instrument was used to create them. This digital art technology is a”new medium” that eliminates the exposure to toxic chemicals in the various paints. This helps me as a severe allergy sufferer. It promotes speed and accessibility to the entire palette of colors and brush types and sizes without needing a huge studio. Most importantly, the art can be created instantly wherever I am. The digital process of re-creation is that of photography and with newer fine art gallery quality printing technologies these works can be processed on aluminum that is warp-proof, waterproof, needs no glass or frame, and will last for eons with the proper care.

My paintings are now on display right outside of Sedona, AZ at “The Miner’s Pick Gallery” in Jerome at 123 Hill Street located at what once was the hospital and surgeon’s home. Stop in and see Melissa and their incredible offerings of natural wood furniture, crystals, gemstones, geodes, and fossils along with my artwork hanging on the walls.

For more paintings go to http://www.ipadimagination.com

SHATTERED FAITH NET

This book can be ordered at

THE FORWARD BY YVONNE PERRY

The thought processes of some people don‘t always allow for the possibility that the round peg may fit the square hole if the square hole is big enough.

Round peg, square hole? That’s me! My eyes perked up when I read that comment by Nick Oliva, and I knew I was going to enjoy reading the rest of this book.
Nick. Me. Neither of us fit the expected mold and both of us have little use for the practices and dogmatic beliefs imposed upon society by organized religions. All my life, I have butted heads with people who find it difficult to relate with me because I have an alternate viewpoint due to the mystical experiences I’ve had.

Nick chose to remove himself from the abuse of controlling religious leaders. I was “removed” from religion in one fell swoop when the universe (spirit, my soul, God, higher self, or whatever you want to call it) booted me out of the church, its teachings, my marriage, my sense of security, and the belief system that I had tenaciously clung to for forty years. I took what was left of my paranormal ass and went to the corner of my pigeon hole to reevaluate what was working in my life and what wasn’t. There was a lot of garbage to sort through as I examined each piece of black-robed ideology and researched modern Christianity back to its roots.

Nick nailed it when he wrote, “I‘m trying to get people to understand that they are responsible for their actions, not―the Lord.” That’s what I’ve been trying to help people understand for the past ten years. When my life fell apart, I soon discovered that it was up to me—not God, the church, or anyone else—to put it back together. What a difference that discovery has made for me. But, try explaining that to folks who have a rigid indoctrinated view of how life and death should operate.

As one who has had two near-death experiences (NDE) and lived to write a book about them, I was very interested to read what Nick had to say about his own near death experience, which occurred when his heart stopped beating for fourteen seconds as he was literally trying to take a shit. You laughed, I heard you! And, you’ll laugh at the wit, logic, and satire Nick Oliva uses to battle the philosophies of the Atheists and Christians who harshly responded to his posts in an online forum. You may also feel angry when you read the chapter titled “The Real Story of the Christian Bible, or that Black Book You’re Holding Isn’t What You Think It Is.” Seventeen hundred years has made a big difference in the “sacred” text!

I can understand Nick’s hesitancy to write about his near-death experience. Maybe that is why he left it for the last course—like a sweet dessert for this meat-heavy meal.

Death is not something most people want to talk about and yet it is something every one of us will ultimately have to face. I’ve never met any Near Death Experiencer who doesn’t tell me that their experience changed his or her life.

The author’s account of his other-world experience gives us encouragement that our fears about what lies beyond the grave are merely preconceived notions passed from one generation to the next. Those, who like Nick and myself, that have experienced an NDE, may find a metaphysical view of life and death more in line with the laws that are written in their hearts rather than on tablets of stone or in the New Times Roman, black leather, gold-leafed, silky-pages of the King James Version.

I’m glad to have found a friend who is brave enough to write his story and approach the fallacies of religion. I hope this book will open some eyes that have been nailed shut like the coffin they avoid peering into. I know of nothing that is deader than someone who will not allow room to question his or her beliefs. As Nick writes, “To not acknowledge the fact that one could be wrong is to show the greatest ignorance to life itself.” Yet, when it comes to discussing anything spiritual that does involve Jesus Christ, Christianity, or religion, Nick’s reason and logic will probably hit a brick wall—especially when presented to fundamentalists who want to legislate their staunch morals through political leaders.

You may think that I hate those who fill the church pews on Sunday or preach the “not-so-good-news.” I mean, what’s so good about being told that you’re a sinner bound for hell and that you must believe a certain way to avoid damnation? I don’t hate anyone, but I do hate the behavior of some. Like Nick, I can accept anyone who treats others with love and respect. As long as he or she doesn’t try to convert me to his or her way of thinking, it really doesn‘t matter to me what he or she believes or does—as long as he or she does no harm to anyone else in the process.

“If we all could keep our fear, greed, and pride at bay we could accomplish great things in the course of human history.”…Just imagine how the world would change if we took Nick’s words to heart and started practicing them.

Shattered Faith: To Believe or Not To Believe truly is a gift to humanity. If only we would heed the advice this book contains. I invite you to put down your weapon (fear), stop hating those you don‘t understand, and prepare to be tolerant as you delve into this gift.

Yvonne Perry

Author of RIGHT TO RECOVER: Winning the Political and Religious Wars Over Stem Cell Research in America and MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: True Stories About Death, Dying, and Afterlife

CHEAPTRICKPEPPERS

Cheap Trick performing the Beatles??? Has the world gone mad? Well, only a little. One must realize that Cheap Trick, formed in 1974, built quite a fan base through its own brand of using power-rock chords that emoted a hard-edge but retained enough melodic themes that attracted those on the outer currents of pop rock and punk rock. Their music does combines the tune- worthy formulaic modes of The Beatles but with an energy that speeds up without bowling over into pure ranting and screaming of those in the punk rock genre of that time. The Los Angeles Times has remarked that “Cheap Trick gained fame by twisting the Beatlesque into something shinier, harder, more American.” Your next question is: What were their biggest hits? A few include the songs “Surrender”, “I Want You to Want Me”, and “Dream Police.”

So it was with ardent curiosity when the available ticket brought me to the Hilton Theater, my favorite venue to see them perform Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band. Having seen Paul McCartney in sold-out arenas four times and never hearing anything as elaborate as a 21 piece orchestra, 6 backup vocalists, a children’s choir, mixed with an old rock bank that I’d thought had hit the old folks home by now, I couldn’t imagine how this escapade could be pulled off credibly. Featured guest artists included Grammy-Award winning vocalist Joan Osborne, Rob Laufer, Bill Lloyd, and Ian Ball all of whom performed in the beginning of the show before Cheap Trick entered the stage through a very clever revolving set that housed the entire orchestra 16 feet up in the air and provided three circular stages underneath them to facilitate the quick turnover to the Sgt. Pepper’s portion. As the curtain rose that set was exposed.

The orchestra opened with an absolutely beautiful symphonic medley of “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” “She Loves You,” “Love Me Do,” and “Please, Please Me.” Ms. Osborne then took the stage and deftly sang “Can’t Buy Me Love,” and the timeless “Long and Winding Road.” The orchestra then took over and performed the classic “Eleanor Rigby.” Let me stop here a moment to comment that in the nineties I lived in Puerto Rico and had the chance to see the Puerto Rican Symphony Orchestra perform Holst’s incredible symphony “The Planets.” That alone was a rare treat unto itself. The most marvelous thing of this show was to watch these players moving and thrusting their bodies into such soulful unpretentious mesmerizations of being one with the vibrations that they perfectly emitted from their instruments, that they naturally drew you into their magical mojo as an unintentional byproduct of their emotionalism and love of their craft exactly as those moments I experienced many years ago.

The engineer’s use of effects to recreate Lennon’s experiment of running his voice through a Leslie speaker for “Across the Universe” with the Las Vegas Children’s Choir was as ethereal as the original. It was truly like “a wind inside a letter box.”

And then the transition occurred and here was Cheap Trick with Rick Nielsen and his baseball cap and striped suit prancing, dancing, and irreverently swinging his guitar to the beginning of that classic album. The album that the Beach Boy’s leader Brian Wilson called the “perfect album,” the same one that he tried to compose first and gave up his quest after hearing what he perceived as the Beatles’- no the world’s – ultimate recording.

I then realized that when I read Geoff Emerick’s name on the roster as Sound Direction and Co-Producer that it all made sense. Those orchestra parts were exactly as George Martin, “the fifth Beatle” had written them in 1967. Every nuance, speck, part and parcel of each tiny inflection of this live sound mimicked that album without exception. And by the way, Mr. Emerick was the engineer for Sgt. Pepper’s back in 1967 so there was the connection to the “how” of this event.

The bonus tracks of “Golden Slumbers,” “Carry That Weight,” “The End” and the show “encore,” “All You Need is Love,” brings the Beatles’ genius and the energy and vivaciousness of the current band playing their hearts out into focus after experiencing the beginnings of their musical careers at the top of the show. It was a wise choice than to end with just the Sgt. Pepper’s songs, as the orchestra was already there for that monumental epic, why not go out with a huge bang from their later material? Good call on the producer’s part although I wish someone had sung “Something” that perfect ode to George’s wife Patti Boyd, instead of Bill Lloyd playing lead guitar on the melody, but that is a minor complaint.

And lest I forget a huge part of this ensemble was Magic Christian, the keyboardist who provided all of McCartney’s piano parts and used his synthesizers perfectly to authenticate each track. Todd Youth on bass enthusiastically played every Mac line note-for-note and the conductor affectionately introduced as “Billy Shears” did an outstanding job putting the orchestra though it’s amazing paces this fine evening.

The most amazing part of the show came when George Harrison’s “Within You, Without You” was performed. An authentic Indian ensemble appeared with Gingger Shankar (Her mother was a classical singer, and her father, L. Subramaniam, is a world renowned violinist) playing the double violin, with two sitar players, and bass and treble Tampura instruments exactly capturing this spiritual encompassment of Mr. Harrison’s experience with the music and religious aura of that nation.

The vocals of Rob Laufer were magically suited to every note of the past and this was more than just a band rehashing an old classic. The entire experience, as exacting as it was, evoked new emotional thrills by the live performances of both a rock band and orchestra blending into a dimension of past time that never was. This was a “what if” had the Beatles kept touring and attempted such an endeavor to achieve such lushness of a tracked album by being backed by a full orchestra and vocalists. It was the concert that never was performed by the seemingly most unlikely band using the most unlikely Beatles album. It worked magnificently!

I ran into people who had seen it more than once and honestly I would have gone back for seconds and thirds myself. I mean when the song Sgt. Pepper’s Reprise kicks in that rooster crowing for that split second, the madness of the orchestra of “Day in the Life” swells and then crescendos to its ultimate conclusion, and then that infamous orchestral down stroke to the tonic note, what more does one want out of a concert? It is real and it is hair-raising. I could go on and on about every small detail and the attentiveness paid to each and every one of them, but my suggestion is if you can go see it-GO! This tour will not last forever, like the original band, like any ephemeral burst of pure creativity, the moment passes quickly. Take the time and listen to what could have been, but was only preserved on tape and disc until now. It’s no cheap trick believe me.